New Moms Face New Challenges: Tips to Prioritize Your Wellness

Brandpoint  |  2016-01-14

(BPT) - The smiles, the soft coos and yes, even that now all-too-familiar cry – it’s only been a few months but already you can’t picture life without your little one. You’re constantly focused on their every movement and will do anything to make sure they have what they need. But while you’re focused on your baby’s happiness and health, who’s doing the same for you?

“It’s common for new moms to put the needs of their baby first,” says Dr. Jessica Shepherd, a practicing OB/GYN, women’s health expert and founder of Her Viewpoint, a premier online women’s health community. “While it’s a natural tendency for most mothers, it’s critical they don’t ignore their own health. My resounding message to all new moms is that the healthier you are, the better you’ll be able to take care of your newborn.”

To better take care of yourself so you can ensure your overall wellness and that of your child, Dr. Shepherd offers these five tips:

  • Manage your expectations. Your baby’s arrival didn’t come with a cape so don’t expect to be Super Mom. It’s OK to ask for help when you need it, and if something doesn’t go the way you planned, don’t be too hard on yourself. Learn from the situation and move on.

  • Address stress urinary incontinence. A common result of pregnancy or childbirth is stress urinary incontinence (SUI) – bladder leaks triggered by everyday activities like coughing, sneezing, laughing or exercise. Now, women with SUI can have the freedom to live without worrying about their next leak! Poise Impressa Bladder Supports are the first over-the-counter, internal product designed to help stop leaks before they happen. Safely inserted into the vagina like a tampon, Poise Impressa Bladder Supports gently lifts the urethra to help prevent leaks for up to eight hours every day. Note that new moms with SUI should wait at least three months after childbirth before trying Poise Impressa Bladder Supports, but once they do, Impressa can help give them the freedom and confidence to live active, fulfilled lives.

  • Stay active. Yes, being a new mom naturally keeps you pretty active, but it’s also good to take some time for activity that focuses on you instead of your child. Ask your partner, family member or friend to babysit once a week so you can go for a run, hit the gym, take a yoga class or find some other physical activity that reinvigorates you.

  • Don’t skip the most important meal of the day. What did you have for breakfast today? If you routinely skip this meal because you’re so focused on getting the bottle ready, stop. Studies show a good breakfast can leave you feeling more satisfied and empowered with more energy, perfect for taking care of a child.

  • Set an appropriate bedtime… for yourself. Yes, bedtimes aren’t just for your youngsters; they’re good for you as well. Many moms make the mistake of supplementing a lack of sleep with extra caffeine or sugar, exposing them to harmful health effects and weight gain. Instead of spending that last hour of the day in front of the TV or iPad, try going to bed earlier. You’ll be amazed at how much better you feel in the morning.

New motherhood can be the most rewarding experience of your life and it can also be the most taxing, particularly if you haven’t supported your own wellness. However, if you place some much-needed emphasis on you, there’s no reason this first year can’t be as enjoyable for you as it is for your baby. To learn more about how to manage bladder leaks as a result of pregnancy and childbirth, or as a result of other causes, visit Poise.com.

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Tricks for Conquering Winter Germs

Brandpoint  |  2015-12-03

(BPT) - From pencils and paper to snacks and show-and-tell treasures — kids share virtually everything at school. While parents agree sharing is a good skill for kids to learn, it’s certainly not the case when it comes to germs, particularly during cold and flu season. Germs are lurking everywhere and are simply unavoidable. And where there are germs, there can often be sickness. That dreaded first cough, sneeze and sniffle surely brings about anything but joy in the home.

“Every parent has experienced those ‘ew’ moments where kids are kids and regardless of what we do to keep them healthy, sick strikes,” says Dr. Nina Shapiro, leading pediatric doctor and mom of two. “I can certainly speak firsthand on those cringe-worthy moments where the ew is simply unavoidable and the best way to battle it is by being prepared to get kids back on their feet – so you can get a little rest too.”

Here are Dr. Shapiro’s top tips for keeping kids and families healthy during cough, cold and flu season.

  1. Sing the joys of washing hands well

    Washing hands well is one of the most effective ways to prevent the spread of illness, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Kids should regularly wash hands at home and at school. Make scrub time fun by singing while washing — the goal is to wash for 20 seconds, or about the amount of time it takes to sing “Twinkle Twinkle Little Star” once or “Happy Birthday” twice.

  2. Wrangle those hands and avoid the nose and mouth

    Children have busy hands and those tiny fingers often end up in ew-filled places. It’s important to regularly remind kids to keep their hands out of their nose and mouth to help prevent the spread of germs. Seven in 10 school nurses cite unsanitary habits among children like nose picking or not washing their hands as the top cause for germs spreading among kids at school, according to the recent SchoolNurse.com “Ew-dentification” survey conducted by the pediatric brands of Pfizer Consumer Healthcare.

  3. Be a flu-buster and get vaccinated

    It’s very likely at some point during the fall and winter season that your children will come in contact with the flu virus. This year’s vaccination is now available, so schedule an office visit for the whole family. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recently updated their guidelines requiring children ages six months to eight years to receive two doses of the flu shot this season if they have received less than two doses of the flu vaccine prior to July 2015.

  4. Ease aches and pains and rest, rest, rest

    With flu season upon us, parents should be armed with an OTC pain reliever and fever reducer like Children’s Advil(R) which reduces fever fast and keeps it down for up to eight hours, while also relieving aches and pains in children as young as 2 years (based on reducing fever below 100 F). When kids are more comfortable, they are able to get the extra rest their bodies need to fight off illness, ultimately also giving relief to worried parents.

  5. Keep your wellness arsenal fully stocked

    Flu isn’t the only sickness kids may encounter. According to the survey of school nurses, colds, stomach bugs and coughs also frequently spread around schools. For cough and colds, an effective medicine like Children’s Robitussin(R) Cough & Chest Congestion offers relief by breaking up chest congestion and relieving coughs. If a child is suffering from cold symptoms, a medicine like Children’s Dimetapp(R) is great option for relieving stuffy noses and ongoing sniffles. Stock up now so when sickness strikes, you are ready and your child can feel quick relief — no emergency trip to the store required.

  6. Take a deep breath and use that humidifier

    Every family should have a humidifier to get through the cold and flu seasons. By adding moisture to the dry air, you can help your child breathe easier, particularly at night when he or she is trying to sleep.

For more information and tips for coping when sick happens, visit: www.sickjustgotreal.com.

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4 Ways to Keep Kids Safe Outdoors

Brandpoint  |  2015-12-02

(BPT) - Colder temperatures are on their way, but right now the weather is beautiful and that means there’s still plenty of time to get outdoors and enjoy some fresh air. As an adult, spending time outside allows you to pursue passions such as landscaping, lawn games, swimming in the pool or just enjoying the company of family and friends. There’s plenty to do and you know your children enjoy being outdoors just as much as you do.

However, when small children are outside, the potential for accidents increases. To keep them safe and make spending time outdoors an enjoyable experience for everyone, practice these four safety steps.

  • It starts with you. Supervising your child while you’re outdoors together is the easiest way to ward off accidents, but then how do you get anything done? Start by asking your child to join you in completing the task and give them assignments they can manage such as carrying or sorting items. You can also provide toys or a new game they can play in your sight. Finally, join them in the fun. If you can’t make them part of your project, make yourself part of theirs. Play their game in the backyard, swim with them in the pool or go exploring for bugs together.

  • Secure the area. If you want to block off a larger area like a pool or your back yard, a fence can be the answer and can make for one, final DIY project this year. Before you start however, it’s important to contact your city or homeowner’s association to be sure fences are allowed and to learn what type of fence you can install. Then, you need to decide if you will hire someone to install the fence or do it yourself. If you choose to do it yourself, be sure to contact your power provider so they can mark the proper power lines before you dig.

  • Use the right tools. A fence can keep your child safe, but eventually they’ll learn to open the gate. To protect kids during these inquisitive years, D&D Technologies recently launched Magna Latch Alert, the world’s first integrated alarm with new audible and visual features. Magna Latch Alert easily attaches to any gate and emits a single alert beep when the gate is opened. It will even notify you if the gate has not been securely and fully latched. Magna Latch Alert is made from high performance polymers so it won’t rust in rain or snow, making it the perfect choice for any outdoor space where safety is a must.

  • Educate yourself. Despite your best efforts, accidents can happen and if one does, it’s essential you’re prepared. Make sure you’re trained in CPR and mouth-to-mouth and you’re aware of your child’s allergies. Finally, remembering 9-1-1 is easy but you should also have the number for poison control plugged into your phone, just in case.

No matter what outdoor activity you have planned, it will be more fun if you know everyone around you is safe. Institute the four steps above and you’ll be able to enjoy the rest of this year’s beautiful outdoor days without a concern.

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Is Your Baby Ready for Chewing?

NewsUSA  |  2015-12-01

(NewsUSA) - Taking the step up from baby food to table food requires a key skill: chewing. Chewing is a learned skill, and parents can help their babies make the transition by offering a mix of appropriately textured foods.

Before introducing textured foods, review a baby's readiness. Signs that a baby is ready to begin eating soft foods include crawling with his or her stomach off the floor, pulling up to a standing position, starting to mash food with the jaws and attempting to feed him or herself (not necessarily successfully, but making the effort).

Learning to chew takes practice. It's not a skill babies develop instantly or even over a limited period of time, such as one month. Studies show that even when babies reach 3 years of age, they are still mastering chewing skills. Baby foods that combine different textures allow babies who are at the crawling or standing stage to simply explore those textures in their mouths without having to navigate separate foods. For older babies, small, soft food pieces can help promote side-to-side tongue movement and jaw mashing movement as preparation for chewing. Children who eat foods with chunky textures before the 10-month mark have an easier time transitioning to table food.

Textured foods such as those in Gerber's Lil' Bits recipe collection are specifically designed with soft bits of food sized for babies' mouths and a gradual progression in texture to help them further develop their chewing skills. Gerber experts analyzed more than 20 hours of video footage of babies chewing and mashing food, and tested approximately 30,000 spoonfuls of food to develop optimally sized food pieces that promote chewing ability.

We hold ourselves to high standards and bring deep passion to making baby food," a company statement notes. "We only work with farmers who comply with our strict quality standards, use cooking practices that help ensure our products are safe and developmentally appropriate, and test our products with babies from our panel of 2,000 Tiny Taste Testers. We do all of this to help ensure that our baby food is as delicious as it is nutritious."

The Gerber Lil' Bits collection includes 11 fruit and vegetable options and six dinner options, resulting from more than 80 taste tests to ensure baby approval. Recipes include Chicken Itty-Bitty Noodle, Garden Vegetable & Beef, and Autumn Vegetable & Turkey.

For more information, and to share photos of your baby's first chewing efforts, please visitwww.gerber.com/learntochew.

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How to Help Your Child Get Over Math Anxiety

NewsUSA  |  2015-11-24

(NewsUSA) - Were you a math whiz growing up, or did you struggle and feel anxious at the mere mention of math? As a parent, you surely don't want your child to experience the same thing.

"It's easy to help your child not only excel at math but also enjoy it," says Raj Valli, the founder ofTabtor Math, a tablet-based math learning program for K-8 children personalized by a dedicated tutor. "Create a math-friendly environment, make math a playful language and participate in an ongoing dialogue about math."

Valli offers the following advice for helping your child enjoy math.

Create a positive environment around math. Since children model the attitudes of those around them, speak positively about math (even hiding your true feelings). Say encouraging phrases like, "It's really cool that you can use math every day."

Think about math as a language. Because children begin using language when they are very young, they don't feel the same anxiety about reading and writing as they do about math. To transfer this positive attitude over to math, approach math as a language, rather than as a "problem." Count things together, measure things together and talk about the numbers involved in any activity you are doing together. Don't worry too much about getting answers "right" or "wrong." Instead, help them think through the process of using math aloud, in words.

Hold a math "dialogue" centered on everyday activities. Once your child is comfortable with thinking about math in language terms, ask at the supermarket how many cookies are in a package and how your child calculated this answer. She might refer to the size of the package or the size of the cookies inside. Whether right or wrong, it's important to emphasize the process used in her head to make the guess. This gets her thinking about math as a visual subject involving shape and volume, rather than just as numbers in a line.

You might ask an older child how many slices of bread are in a loaf, how thick each slice is and how long the loaf is. Open the package to see how close the estimate was. He will learn to feel comfortable with estimating and will enjoy a conversation with you using math as a focal point.

If you set the stage correctly, you'll find that your child enjoys math more than you did -- and then you can relax and enjoy your child's future success in the classroom.

To learn more, please visit www.tabtor.com.

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